The New No Glue Tape: Film Wrap

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Three years ago, while we were packing up to move to our new residence some five hundred or so miles away, a family friend dropped in to see how we were doing.  It just so happened that she and her hubby went through a recent uprooting and had a few tips of their own concerning packing and wrapping.

The one that really stuck was the use of film wrap or flat twine as it is often called, much like your food wrap, to close, tie, hold, wrap and cover just about anything.  It works especially well on odd shaped objects.

The nice thing about this stuff is the lack of glue to get stuck all over your furniture and boxes from packing tape or masking tape.  The more wraps you use the tighter it can be pulled and is very hard to break apart.

Just a couple of wraps around a dresser or chest of drawers and they will not flop open when the dresser is handled.  That bundle of garden tools can be wrapped together; all your brooms, dust mops, drapery rods and the likes get the same treatment.

Out in the workshop, this stuff really shines.  All my like-sized small lumber pieces are wrapped together, first to keep them organized and second, to keep the warping and twisting down to a minimum. If I have to glue up odd shapes, this film wrap is just the ticket.  Remember the more wraps, the tighter it gets and believe me, you can put a lot of pressure on the film and it stretches a long way before you break it.

Finding the end is not a problem either, not like packing tape.  Just dampen the end of your finger and rub it over the roll and the edge pops right up in a little rolled ridge.

When I want to put a sacrificial top plate on my plastic or metal saw horses, I cut a length of lumber the width of the saw horse or longer and just wrap the daylights out of it.  It will withstand a couple hundred saw cuts before it starts to loosen up.

I found small rolls at the dollar stores for of course, a dollar, but you can buy wider and larger refills, up to about fourteen inches wide at a lot of hardware stores.  Cost for the larger rolls varies.

I have saved a lot of money on electrical, packing, masking and duct tape by using this inexpensive film wrap.  You might also find it under the name of cling wrap, cling film, pallet wrap, or shrink wrap.  It is safe and easy to use and takes up no space in the workshop.  A very handy, inexpensive helper for your home and shop.



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